Archives: Episode

China’s Moral Ranking System is Both Foreign and Familiar; Also, Concerns of TMI on Medical Risks

The idea that a government would rank its citizens based on their moral conduct is probably jarring to most Americans, so James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss how China’s social credit system appears to be a very foreign concept in some ways while also being very familiar in others (01:36).  The guys also consider the concern that has been raised that the scientific breakthroughs which may allow cancer to be diagnosed extremely early could possibly be too much to handle for our psyches (35:16).China’s ‘social credit’ system ranks citizens and punishes them with throttled internet speeds and flight bans if the Communist Party deems them untrustworthy (Business Insider)China’s Social Credit System: Speculation vs. Reality (The Diplomat)Social Credit System (Wikipedia)Will We All Soon Live in Cancerland? (WSJ)Science Surgery: ‘Do we all have potentially cancerous cells in our bodies?’ (Cancer Research UK)

Read More
Call It Like I See It
Call It Like I See It
China’s Moral Ranking System is Both Foreign and Familiar; Also, Concerns of TMI on Medical Risks
Loading
/

Netflix’s “Behind the Curve” and the Belief in a Flat Earth

The belief that the Earth is flat persists in the 21st century, so James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana take a look at Behind the Curve, the 2018 documentary by Daniel J. Clark on Netflix and discuss what stands out about those who believe it, how the scientific community has responded, and the way certain aspects our humanity are illustrated through the topic in another installment of their Streaming Between the Lines series. Behind the Curve (Netflix)

Read More
Call It Like I See It
Call It Like I See It
Netflix's "Behind the Curve" and the Belief in a Flat Earth
Loading
/

Public Health Warnings on Children’s Mental and Physical Health; Also, Americans’ Money Worries

Seeing reports from public health officials about the declining physical and mental health of children, James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana consider how society may be failing he younger generations and what type of approach can turn things around (01:13).  The guys also discuss why Americans in general appear to worry more about money than people from other places (29:55).  Surgeon general warns of emerging youth mental health crisis in rare public advisory (LA Times)CDC says childhood obesity is a serious problem in the United States (MSN)What You’re Really Worried About When You’re Worried About Money (The Atlantic)

Read More
Call It Like I See It
Call It Like I See It
Public Health Warnings on Children’s Mental and Physical Health; Also, Americans’ Money Worries
Loading
/

Another New Variant of the Not So Novel Coronavirus; Also, the Startling Decline in Birth Rates

Another named variant of the 2019 coronavirus has emerged, and James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss the emerging Omicron variant, society’s initial reaction to the news of its emergence, and how our mindset in terms of dealing with COVID-19 must continue to evolve over time as circumstances change (01:25).  The guys also consider the significance of falling birth rates for humans around the world and also how societal factors influence, and will be influenced by, people having less babies (30:21). New evidence shows omicron likely spreads twice as fast as delta in South Africa (NPR)Study: Omicron could be more transmissible due to sharing genetic material with common cold (The Hill)Which COVID-19 variants are most common in the US? (USA Facts)First data on Covid omicron variant’s severity is ‘encouraging,’ Fauci says (CNBC)Why birth rates are falling, and why it’s no big deal (Popular Science)Why a decline in US birth rates could actually help our economy (Popular Science)

Read More
Call It Like I See It
Call It Like I See It
Another New Variant of the Not So Novel Coronavirus; Also, the Startling Decline in Birth Rates
Loading
/

The Great Resignation and the Expansion of What is Possible; Also, Pavlov’s Notifications

Americans are quitting their jobs in unprecedented numbers, and James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana take a look at how this “Great Resignation” has been spurred by many different technological, cultural, and economic trends, several of which have operated to expand what is possible as far as earning a living (01:09).  The guys also discuss how the constant stream of notifications that many receive on the electronic devices may have a greater impact on us than it seems (38:50).  The ‘Great Resignation’ is more of a ‘Great Reckoning,’ led by low-wage and minority workers (CNBC)A record number of Americans quit their jobs in September (CNN)The ‘Great Resignation’: Why workers are quitting (Local NBC – KOBI-TV 5)The ‘Great Resignation’ is altering the workforce dynamic — maybe for good (CNBC)Part of the ‘great resignation’ is actually just mothers forced to leave their jobs (The Guardian)These entrepreneurs used the ‘Great Resignation’ to reinvent themselves. Here’s how they did it (CNBC)Ping. Ding. Chirp. Notifications Are Driving Us Crazy. (WSJ) (Apple Link)

Read More
Call It Like I See It
Call It Like I See It
The Great Resignation and the Expansion of What is Possible; Also, Pavlov’s Notifications
Loading
/

Streaming Between the Lines – Marshall

Marshall, the 2017 biopic on Thurgood Marshall, tells us about a time in Marshall’s life before the Supreme Court and Brown v. Board of Education, and James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss what stood out most in this Reginald Hudlin film as well as Thurgood Marshall’s legacy and how he fits into the story of America.Marshall (Netflix)

Read More
Call It Like I See It
Call It Like I See It
Streaming Between the Lines - Marshall
Loading
/

Global Cooperation Needed to Keep the Planet Habitable for Humans; Also, Body Odor Language

Keeping the Earth habitable for humans would seemingly be in everyone’s interest, and James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana consider how multi-faceted our environmental issues can be and how COP26 and the Glasgow Climate Pact each show far we have come, and how far we still have to go, from a global cooperation standpoint (01:30).  The guys also discuss how human bodies are constantly emitting odors and how these odors actually tell a lot about you and your health and lifestyle, not just your hygiene (38:51). What is a COP? (COP26 Website)COP26: What was agreed at the Glasgow climate conference? (BBC)In surprise move, U.S. and China vow to work together on climate change (NBC News)American bumblebees have disappeared from these 8 states. Now they could face extinction. (USA Today)Here’s What Will Happen If Bees Go Extinct (Green Matters)Judge approves $626 million settlement in Flint water crisis case (CBS News)US intelligence community warns of devastating long-term impact of coronavirus pandemic (CNN)What Your Smell Says About You (WSJ) (Apple link)

Read More
Call It Like I See It
Call It Like I See It
Global Cooperation Needed to Keep the Planet Habitable for Humans; Also, Body Odor Language
Loading
/

What Could Go Right, and Wrong, with Big Tech in Real Estate; Also, Toxic Positivity

Even with Zillow’s decision to get out of real estate buying and selling, the “ibuyer” trend still seems to be just getting started, so James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss the possibilities brought by the entrance of technology companies, and algorithms, into the real estate market (01:23).  The guys also consider the concept of toxic positivity and how being around it can make it harder to deal with adversity (33:27). Zillow just gave up on ibuying. What’s the deal with the algorithmic home sales? (LA Times)Inside the collapse of Zillow: hundreds of homes to hit Orlando market (WFTV)What the rest of us can learn from Zillow’s real estate stumbles (Fortune)Zillow’s flip-flop shows limits for Big Data in property (Financial Times)Toxic Positivity Is Very Real, and Very Annoying (WSJ)

Read More
Call It Like I See It
Call It Like I See It
What Could Go Right, and Wrong, with Big Tech in Real Estate; Also, Toxic Positivity
Loading
/

School Board Threats and (Grand)Standing Between Enforcement of the Law; Also, Killer Autonomous Drones

After seeing the existence of violent threats against school board members turned into a media event, James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana discuss the need to protect public servants, freedom of speech, and how content that drives media consumption now determines our political discussions (01:47).  The guys also discuss reports of the first autonomous killer drone being deployed in combat and how this could change everything (40:11). Our dumbed-down debate over the Justice Department and schools (WaPo)Garland defends memo on violent threats to school boards (CBS News)Ted Cruz Asks Merrick Garland If ‘Nazi Salutes’ Are a Form of Protected Free Speech (Newsweek)What Does Free Speech Mean? (uscourts.gov)One Woman’s Mission to Rewrite Nazi History on Wikipedia (Wired)Philadelphia nativist riots (Wikipedia)Autonomous Drones Have Attacked Humans. This Is a Turning Point (Popular Mechanics)

Read More
Call It Like I See It
Call It Like I See It
School Board Threats and (Grand)Standing Between Enforcement of the Law; Also, Killer Autonomous Drones
Loading
/

Culture Series: The Power of Now, a Book by Eckhart Tolle

Eckhart Tolle’s “The Power of Now” is said to be the bestselling spiritual book of the past 20 years and has been read by millions, and James Keys and Tunde Ogunlana take a look a some of the key concepts that were addressed in the book (01:14) and consider the extent to which the teachings in the book could help humans on a societal level (36:38). The Power of Now (Publisher – New World Library)Excerpt of The Power of Now (Eckhart Tolle)

Read More
Call It Like I See It
Call It Like I See It
Culture Series: The Power of Now, a Book by Eckhart Tolle
Loading
/